Grammar Wars III: Return of Newspeak

Grammar Wars III: Return of Newspeak

You knew this was going to happen, right? Hopefully, it won’t mean I come back in a few years with three more posts that grossly disappoint everyone. The reason for yet another grammar article was, you guessed it, another embarrassing gaff on my part. As before, I believe it illustrates another interesting point in modern grammar; the effect technology is having on grammar and the language and the gradual shift towards fulfilling George Orwell‘s prediction of Newspeak.

Grammar Wars II – The Editor Strikes Back

Grammar Wars II – The Editor Strikes Back

Last week’s ‘Grammar Wars‘ post was extremely popular amongst old and new readers. Yet it wasn’t free of problems and revealed a couple of other points worth exploring. Plus, the obvious sequel title was just too tempting.

Grammar Wars

Grammar Wars

Although, by night, I may pose as a mild-mannered blogger and amateur scriptwriter, by day I work as copywriter and online editor for Netregistry. Therefore, I was a little surprised to receive the following comment on a recent promotional piece I wrote to launch the new web copy service.

Linkbait-Gate: Money.co.uk Apologises

Linkbait-Gate: Money.co.uk Apologises

A quick note to point out to readers that money.co.uk has put up a formal apology on their website for promoting fabricated news. lso, the original page containing the offending article has had a full disclaimer added.

Linkbait-Gate: Examining the Fallout

Linkbait-Gate: Examining the Fallout

After last Friday’s post discussing the issue of fabricated linkbait, I thought I had said everything I needed to on the topic. No one was more surprised than me to see the debate rage on and on over the last seven days, with a number of arguments put forward on both sides. It quickly became apparent that for many, the problem wasn’t merely the fabrication of news for linkbait, but the large number of SEM professionals that applauded the development.